Fault Lines: Combating Extremism with Farah Pandith

In This Episode: “This organization called Al Qaeda has attacked our country. They’re trying to define my nation and they’re trying to define my religion. And I can’t sit here in Boston and not serve.”

Fault Lines welcomes Farah Pandith, first-ever Special Representative to Muslim Communities and recent author of How We Win: How Cutting-Edge Entrepreneurs, Political Visionaries, Enlightened Business Leaders and Social Media Mavens Can Defeat the Extremist Threat.  What role do young people have to play in countering extremism? Where do we stand in the war on terror? Has America invested enough in soft power?  What does Harry Potter have to do with it?  Farah and Fault Lines Host Les Munson, answer these questions and many more!

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Fault Lines: Foreign Policy Quarantined

In This Episode: “If there was ever a moment for US leadership to advocate for why active membership and shaping of the international system benefits Americans – now would be the time.”

CoVid-19 is spreading across the globe and is impacting every aspect of American life. Dana, Jamil, Les, and returning guest Katrina Mulligan, discuss the implications of the virus on American foreign policy, our adversaries, and our allies.  What role should the United States play internationally during this crisis?  How is our response different from China’s?  Was “America First” right all along?  Answers to these questions and more on this week’s episode of Fault Lines.

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Fault Lines: Maximum Pressure

In This Episode: “The country post-Iraq is not behind a policy of regime change. Regime change – those words are toxic words politically in the United States.”

Fault Lines welcomes Rich Goldberg, former Director for Countering Iranian Weapons of Mass Destruction for the White House National Security Council, to discuss U.S.-Iranian Policy. Rich laid out the policy of the current administration in a recent op-ed in the New York Times. What should Americans know about this “maximum pressure” campaign? If not regime change, what should the goal of U.S.-Iranian policy be? What should a new deal look like? Rich and guest host, Dana Stroul, answer these questions and many more!

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The Race to 5G: Securing the Win

 

This NSI Law and Policy Paper:

  • Describes the path and promise of 5G, the potential security implications therein, and United States and international policy responses as networks get deployed globally.
  • Evaluates the key issues at stake for U.S. national security and innovation in 5G.
  • Argues that the free market will provide better 5G security, and that the threat of Huawei and ZTE in the supply chain cannot be mitigated.
  • Proposes actionable recommendations to enhance 5G security, while promoting U.S. and Western-valued leadership in the telecommunications infrastructure needed to power transformative technologies key to America’s economic and national security.

Click here to read the complete paper.

About the author:

Andy Keiser is a Fellow at the National Security Institute at the Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason University.  Mr. Keiser is a Principal at Navigators Global and previously served 14 years on Capitol Hill for former House Intelligence Committee Chairman Mike Rogers – as Senior Advisor to the Committee, Chief of Staff, and Legislative Director handling all national security policy issues.

Fault Lines: Peace In Our Time?

In This Episode: “I’m not suggesting the Trump Administration is right on this.  In fact they’re wrong in Iraq, they’re wrong in Syria, and they’re wrong in Afghanistan.  Just like Barack Obama was wrong on Iraq, wrong on Syria, and wrong on Afghanistan”

On February 29th, Zalmay Khalilzad, America’s Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation at the State Department, and Abdul Ghani Baradar, a representative of the Taliban, signed the Agreement for Bringing Peace to Afghanistan. This agreement comes of the heels of a temporary cease fire and purports to be a stepping stone to intra-Afghan negotiations. Andy, Dana, Jamil, and first time guest Katrina Mulligan, Managing Director for National Security and International Policy at the Center for American Progress, discuss the implications of the peace agreement on the ground in Afghanistan and politically in the United States. In this episode, Andy commends Amrullah Saleh’s piece in Time and Dana reads from Representative Tom Malinowski’s op-ed in the Washington Post.

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Fault Lines: Can the U.S. Solve Foreign Crises Before They Start?

In This Episode: “There is not a model for nation building.  We do not build nations.  The citizens of a country build themselves.” says George Ingram, Senior Fellow in Global Economy and Development at the Brookings Institution.

Fault Lines welcomes George Ingram, Senior Fellow in Global Economy and Development at the Brookings Institution, to discuss US assistance in fragile states. George recently served as an advisor to a congressionally-mandated task force looking at this issue. Can American foreign aid programs address the root causes of war and violent extremism? How are Congress and the Trump administration using the foreign policy toolbox to address crises before they start? How are our foreign aid programs fitting in as the US pivots toward the Great Power Competition with China? George and our host, Lester Munson, answer these questions and many more!

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Fault Lines: China’s Big Bet In Africa

In This Episode: “So the question on the table is really whether or not [investment from China] is beneficial for a country like Kenya, or if China is really acting as a new colonial power.” says Fault Lines Host Jodi Herman.

China is spending $20 billion or more each year in Africa and inundating the continent with infrastructure projects, cheap phones, television programming, and communications networks. Why is China making this bet and is it working? How are the Trump administration and Congress responding and what is at stake for American interests? Guest NSI Fellow Andy Keiser sits in again with Jodi, Dana and Lester to discuss these questions and many more.

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Fault Lines: Hot Topics in the Arctic

In This Episode: “You know nature abhors a vacuum, and, as the polar ice cap shrinks, people are going to move in and the degree of human activity is going to increase” says NSI Visiting Fellow and former senior intelligence official Jim Danoy.

What do Russia, China and Canada all have in common?  All disagree – in one manner or another – with American policy goals in the Arctic, where climate change is driving opportunities and challenges for US policy-makers.  In this episode, former senior intelligence official Jim Danoy discusses his paper, “The Arctic: Securing the High Ground,” with host Lester Munson.  They discuss the fascinating policy dilemmas posed by the unique geography of the North Pole and how the United States can exploit new opportunities to maximum benefit.

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Fault Lines: Gobsmackingly Apparent

In This Episode: “This to me is another example that this model is not stable and it doesn’t do better for its people” says former Senior Staffer on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Dana Stroul

Our favorite foreign policy nerds – with the addition of NSI Visiting Fellow Andy Keiser – discuss the geopolitics of the Coronavirus that has massively impacted China and its economy.  Listen in as Jodi, Dana, Lester and Andy discuss what the Coronavirus pandemic may mean for China’s place in the world, China’s internal politics, and the ins-and-outs of the U.S. response.

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Fault Lines: War and Peace, or: How Do You Solve a Problem Named Putin

In This Episode: “I actually think we are losing when it comes to the international arena.  We look at what’s happening in the Middle East and the whip hand today goes to Russia and goes to Turkey” says NSI Founder and Executive Director Jamil N. Jaffer.

Jodi, Dana, Jamil and Lester discuss constitutional changes in Moscow, the future of Vladimir Putin, how the United States should handle Russian aggression and whether Republicans and Democrats have any common ground on the matter.

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Fault Lines Podcast: China

 

 

 

The National Security Institute is excited to announce NSI’s second episode in our Fault Lines podcast mini-series with Lawfare.  This episode focused on the U.S.-China relationship and featured Fault Lines regulars:

  • NSI Founder and Executive Director Jamil N. Jaffer;
  • NSI Senior Fellow and former Staff Director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Lester Munson;
  • Former Staff Director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Jodi Herman
  • Former Senior Democratic Staffer for the Middle East on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Dana Stroul

Fault Lines brings together experts with years of experience working on national security issues that divide the political left and right.  This series aspires to highlight both the areas of stark contrast and unlikely agreement in foreign policy-making that exist in today’s polarized atmosphere.

Subscribe to the Lawfare Podcast to get this and future episodes of Fault Lines.

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Combating Digital Authoritarianism: U.S. Alternative Needed to Counter Data Localization and Government Control

 

This NSI Report:

  • Describes the global trend toward data localization—policies that require data to be stored within national borders and often impede cross-border flows.
  • Explains the digital divide between authoritarian regimes’ use of data localization as a key means of information and political control, and more nascent efforts at a democratic alternative.
  • Argues that a U.S. data privacy and security framework is needed to counter the rising authoritarian model that is fostering a global splinternet and debilitating democratic values across the globe.

Read the complete paper.

About the author:

Dr. Andrea Little Limbago is the Chief Social Scientist at Virtru.  She is an NSI Senior Fellow and also serves as NSI’s Associate Director of Emerging Technologies. 

NSI Law & Policy Paper – Untangling the Guantanamo Military Commissions

 

This NSI Law and Policy Paper:

  • Describes the history and purpose of the military commissions convened at Guantanamo Bay as well as the protracted delays plaguing several of the government’s highest-priority commissions trials;
  • Evaluates the rationale behind military commissions “apparent unlawful influence” jurisprudence, the contempt powers of the military commissions trial judiciary, and detainee monitoring at Guantanamo Bay – issues that have contributed significantly to the unreasonably long pre-trial litigation phase of the commissions;
  • Argues that modest reforms would enable the commissions to accelerate the pace of pretrial litigation without undermining the rights of the Accused;
  • Proposes actionable recommendations that can help resolve these procedural delays to justice and protect an important war power for the United States.

Click here to read the complete paper.

About the Author:

Adam Pearlman is a former Associate Deputy General Counsel of the United States Department of Defense.  While at DoD, he was agency counsel for complex civil and criminal national security matters in federal and military courts, and led the Supreme Court and appellate unit of the team dedicated to litigating classified counterterrorism cases.

Fault Lines Podcast

 

The National Security Institute is excited to announce NSI’s first episode in our Fault Lines podcast mini-series with Lawfare.  This episode focused on the ongoing civil war in Yemen, Saudi Arabia, and American policy in the region and featured Fault Lines regulars:

  • NSI Founder and Executive Director Jamil N. Jaffer;
  • NSI Senior Fellow and former Staff Director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Lester Munson;
  • Former Staff Director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Jodi Herman
  • Former Senior Democratic Staffer for the Middle East on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Dana Stroul

Fault Lines brings together experts with years of experience working on national security issues that divide the political left and right.  The series aspires to highlight both the areas of stark contrast and unlikely agreement in foreign policy-making that exist in today’s polarized atmosphere.

Subscribe to the Lawfare Podcast to get this and future episodes of Fault Lines.

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NSI White Paper – Jordan: A Critical Ally in a Dangerous and Vital Region

 

This NSI White Paper:

  • Explains the continuing U.S. national security interest in the Middle East.
  • Describes the important role Jordan plays in helping the U.S. achieve its goals in the Middle East.
  • Offers steps that should be taken to strengthen the U.S.-Jordan relationship.

Read the complete paper here.

About the Author:

Matthew R. A. Heiman is an NSI Senior Fellow and former lawyer in the National Security Division, U.S. Department of Justice.  Previously, Mr. Heiman was the Vice President, Corporate Secretary & Associate General Counsel at Johnson Controls.  Prior to its merger with Johnson Controls, Mr. Heiman held a number of positions with Tyco International.