The Arctic: Securing the High Ground

 

This NSI Law and Policy Paper:

  • Describes the changing security dynamic in the Arctic as a result of increased access to the region.
  • Evaluates the actions undertaken by Arctic stakeholders including key U.S. competitors Russia and China.
  • Argues for more robust action by the U.S. in the Arctic to include leveraging key partnerships.
  • Proposes actionable recommendations aimed at the U.S. establishing a credible and persistent presence in the Arctic.

Click here to read the complete paper.


About the author:

James P. Danoy is a Visiting Fellow at the National Security Institute at the Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason University.  Mr. Danoy is a career intelligence officer with the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) and is currently serving as the DIA Executive Representative to the FBI and is responsible for leveraging defense and law enforcement intelligence capabilities in support of national security requirements.

Episode 5: Groundhog Day All Over Again?

Fault Lines: Groundhog Day All Over Again?

In This Episode: “I think action should have consequences, and I think NATO collectively should be treating Turkey like the bad actor it is,” says NSI Senior Fellow and Associate Director for Global Security Matthew R. A. Heiman.

What better way to begin Thanksgiving week than to listen to our motley bunch discuss Turkey… and Iran?  Jodi, Dana, Lester and guest Matthew Heiman review protests in Iran, Turkish incursions into Syria, and how Washington is responding.  Is it “Groundhog Day” in Iran?  (What would Bill Murray do?)

Also included: a serious discussion of changing power dynamics in the Middle East and how that affects American interests.


Tune in each week to hear about topics dominating headlines, as well as to gain glimpses into the news stories you may have missed.

NSI Accepting Applications for Technologist Fellowship

The NSI Technologist Fellowship is a year-long fellowship geared at taking technologists from across the country and giving the them the core tools they need to effectively engage policymakers in both the legislative and executive branches on cyber issues.  NSI Technologist fellows have the opportunity to engage with cyber experts and leading technology and national security policymakers.  Past speakers include former House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence Chairman Mike Rogers; Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Director Chris Krebs; former Deputy Director of the National Security Agency Rick Ledgett; National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Deputy Director Dr. Stacey Dixon; and entrepreneur Ron Gula, co-founder of Tenable Network Security.

The goal of the NSI Technologist Fellowship is to enhance technologists’ ability to influence the larger policy community and thereby inject more direct technology-related expertise into the national security and cyber policy processes.

The application for the 2020 class is now open.  Applications are due Tuesday, December 17, 2019.

More Fellowship Information can be found here.

Application Information can be found here.


NSI Technologist Fellowship Class of 2019

Fault Lines Podcast – Episode 2

In This Episode: 

“This decision by the president…it’s a terrible decision, it’s bad for our policy worldwide, it makes our enemies not fear us, it makes our allies not willing to trust us,” says NSI Founder Jamil Jaffer.

This week, Dana, Jamil and Lester delve into two hot spots.  First, in Syria, they will explore the implications of President Trump’s abrupt pullout of American troops for the region and American politics.  Second, they’ll take a look at the dustup between the NBA and China, and what it might mean for the politics of US national security and they’ll also decide who is the greatest basketball player of all-time.

Listen here


Fault Lines is the fortnightly podcast of the National Security Institute at George Mason University, featuring a regular cast of foreign policy experts: Jodi Herman, former Democratic Staff Director for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee; Jamil Jaffer, Founder and Executive Director of the National Security Institute and former Chief Counsel and Senior Advisor for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee; Dana Stroul, former senior professional staff member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee; and moderator Lester Munson, former Staff Director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and adjunct faculty at Johns Hopkins University.

This motley crew will examine national security and foreign policy issues with perspectives from across the political spectrum-finding points of agreement and often disagreement along the way. Each episode explores the topics dominating headlines, as well as gives glimpses into the news stories you may have missed.

A Book Talk: “How We Win”

Monday, October 7
Hazel Hall 215
12 – 1 PM

NSI Advisory Board Member Farah Pandith participated in a conversation about her latest book, How We Win: How Cutting-Edge Entrepreneurs, Political Visionaries, Enlightened Business Leaders, and Social Media Mavens Can Defeat the Extremist Threat.  In her book, Ms. Pandith presents a revolutionary new analysis of global extremism as well as powerful but seldom-used strategies for vanquishing it.  NSI Founder and Executive Director Jamil N. Jaffer interviewed Ms. Pandith.

Watch the video

Fault Lines Podcast – Episode 1


Introducing Fault Lines
A Podcast from the National Security Institute

After three episodes as guests of the Lawfare Podcast, the National Security Institute at George Mason University is stepping out on its own!  Fault Lines will feature a regular cast of foreign policy experts: Jodi Herman, former Democratic Staff Director for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee; Jamil N. Jaffer, Founder and Executive Director of the National Security Institute and former Chief Counsel and Senior Advisor for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee; Dana Stroul, former senior professional staff member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee covering the Middle East, North Africa, and Turkey; and moderator Lester Munson, NSI Senior Fellow and former Staff Director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and adjunct faculty at Johns Hopkins University.This motley crew will examine national security and foreign policy issues with perspectives from across the political spectrum – finding points of agreement and – often – disagreement along the way.


In This Episode: 

“Whether you’re looking at Iran’s efforts to build a covert nuclear program, its use of proxies in Iraq to kill American troops back in 1983 – the bombing of the Marine Corps barracks that killed 241 Americans – they have not been shy about coming directly at their adversaries really almost never since the revolution,” says Fault Line‘s Jodi Herman.

This week, our experts delve into two hot spots.  First, in the Middle East, where Iran attacked Saudi oil facilities, they examine possible reactions from President Trump, who is now without former National Security Advisor John Bolton, as well as the American public’s limit regarding Iranian aggression.  They also argued over whether China, with an ongoing trade dispute with the US, upcoming elections in Taiwan, and continued global attention on China’s crackdown on Uighurs, tempers its response to near open revolt in Hong Kong, and whether Congress is going to do something in light of the Administration’s seeming disinterest.

 

NSI Law and Policy Paper – Critical Access: Enhancing the Value of Private Sector Security Clearances to Protect Critical Infrastructure

This NSI Law and Policy Paper:

  • Describes the development of programs providing high-level clearances to critical infrastructure industry representatives to facilitate information sharing around growing nation state threats.
  • Evaluates the current gaps and inconsistencies among these clearance programs.
  • Argues that information sharing at classified levels is essential and critical infrastructure clearance programs must be enhanced.
  • Provides recommendations to ensure clearance programs are facilitating actionable information sharing and a secure critical infrastructure.

Read the complete paper here.

About the Author:

Jenny Menna is a Visiting Fellow at NSI.  Ms. Menna is currently the Senior Vice President and Cybersecurity Partnership Executive at U.S. Bank.  Ms. Menna previously held a variety of Senior Executive Service positions in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

NSI Law and Policy Paper – Privacy Regulation and Unintended Consequences for Security

This NSI Law and Policy Paper:

  • Describes the federal urgency to act in response to public concern and the rapid global and domestic expansion of comprehensive privacy regulation.
  • Evaluates the implications privacy regulation can have for data protection and beneficial security activities.
  • Argues that AI, biometrics, and certain data categories are all critical to security innovations and activities and must be protected in privacy regulation.
  • Provides actionable recommendations to ensure privacy regulation appropriately balances individual rights with security.

Click here to read the complete paper.

About the Authors:

Megan Brown is an NSI Senior Fellow and Associate Director for Cybersecurity.  She is also a partner at Wiley Rein LLP.  Prior to joining Wiley, Ms. Brown served in the Department of Justice as Counsel to two U.S. Attorneys General.

James B. Burchfield is an NSI Visiting Fellow.  He is a partner at Williams & Jensen PLLC and also serves as a professional staff member for the House Committee on Small Business.

Filling the Vacuum: Harnessing Innovation & Securing Space

Van Metre Hall
July 16
12:00 – 3:00 PM

Jamil N. Jaffer, NSI Founder and Executive Director, and former Chair of the U.S. House Intelligence Committee, NSI Advisory Board Member, and former Rep. Mike Rogers discussed the “Securing the Highest Ground, Integrating Commercial Space Innovation into National Security Missions” report written by Rep. Rogers and Glenn Nye, President & CEO of the Center for the Study of the Presidency & Congress on July 16. Professor Jaffer and Rep. Rogers discussed the importance of a more robust and rapid space industry. Specifically, Rep. Rogers stressed the need for a rapid launch pattern that focuses on private industries that are qualified bidding for space contracts to increase competition, lower costs, and lead to greater innovation. This is in contrast with the current culture and practices of the United States government, which is focused on mission assurance and actively fights against failure. Rep. Rogers stressed that the space industry, both public and private, needs to fail fast and fail often in order to innovate new technologies and to deter adversaries from interfering. Rep. Rogers shared that it took 400,000 people to achieve the moon landing in 1969, and since then the space industry has become smaller and more condensed in its capabilities. By doubling the number of people working in space, costs will be driven down, an industrial base will be encouraged, and new capabilities will be filled.

Following the fireside chat, NSI Senior Fellow Bryan Smith, Former Budget Director, House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence led a discussion, featuring Retired Colonel Lars Hoffman, Senior Vice President, Rocket Lab; Adrian Mangiuca, Commerce Director, NanoRacks; and Jeff Trauberman, Vice President of Government Affairs, VOX Space. These panelists discussed the advantage of harnessing innovation, agility, and cost advantage of commercial companies. The panelists came from different backgrounds of “old space” (traditional space companies), “new space” (up and coming companies), and the government. Despite their backgrounds, the panelists stressed the need for a hybrid architecture of the space industry. They also spoke about the importance of both “old space” and “new space” working together to enhance national security and global commerce.  Watch the entire discussion below.

Fault Lines Podcast: Hot Topics in U.S. Foreign Policy

 

 

 

The National Security Institute is excited to announce NSI’s third episode in our Fault Lines podcast mini-series with Lawfare.  This episode focused on hot topics in U.S. Foreign Policy and featured Fault Lines regulars:

  • NSI Senior Fellow and former lawyer with the National Security Division at DOJ Matthew Heiman;
  • NSI Senior Fellow and former Staff Director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Lester Munson;
  • Former Staff Director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Jodi Herman
  • Former Senior Democratic Staffer for the Middle East on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Dana Stroul

Fault Lines brings together experts with years of experience working on national security issues that divide the political left and right.  This series aspires to highlight both the areas of stark contrast and unlikely agreement in foreign policy-making that exist in today’s polarized atmosphere.

Subscribe to the Lawfare Podcast to get this and future episodes of Fault Lines.

Listen here

Fault Lines Podcast: China

 

 

 

The National Security Institute is excited to announce NSI’s second episode in our Fault Lines podcast mini-series with Lawfare.  This episode focused on the U.S.-China relationship and featured Fault Lines regulars:

  • NSI Founder and Executive Director Jamil N. Jaffer;
  • NSI Senior Fellow and former Staff Director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Lester Munson;
  • Former Staff Director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Jodi Herman
  • Former Senior Democratic Staffer for the Middle East on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Dana Stroul

Fault Lines brings together experts with years of experience working on national security issues that divide the political left and right.  This series aspires to highlight both the areas of stark contrast and unlikely agreement in foreign policy-making that exist in today’s polarized atmosphere.

Subscribe to the Lawfare Podcast to get this and future episodes of Fault Lines.

Listen Now

Combating Digital Authoritarianism: U.S. Alternative Needed to Counter Data Localization and Government Control

 

This NSI Report:

  • Describes the global trend toward data localization—policies that require data to be stored within national borders and often impede cross-border flows.
  • Explains the digital divide between authoritarian regimes’ use of data localization as a key means of information and political control, and more nascent efforts at a democratic alternative.
  • Argues that a U.S. data privacy and security framework is needed to counter the rising authoritarian model that is fostering a global splinternet and debilitating democratic values across the globe.

Read the complete paper.

About the author:

Dr. Andrea Little Limbago is the Chief Social Scientist at Virtru.  She is an NSI Senior Fellow and also serves as NSI’s Associate Director of Emerging Technologies. 

Into the Breach: Responding to Critical Data Incidents

The National Security Institute hosted an invitation-only lunchtime event for data breach lawyers on May 1.  The event featured a fireside chat with NSI Advisory Board Members Matt Olsen, Uber Chief Trust and Security Officer, and Ben Powell, former ODNI General Counsel and NSI Advisory Board member.  They spoke about best practices when responding to critical data incidents.  The event was sponsored by ForgePoint Capital.

NSI Law & Policy Paper – Untangling the Guantanamo Military Commissions

 

This NSI Law and Policy Paper:

  • Describes the history and purpose of the military commissions convened at Guantanamo Bay as well as the protracted delays plaguing several of the government’s highest-priority commissions trials;
  • Evaluates the rationale behind military commissions “apparent unlawful influence” jurisprudence, the contempt powers of the military commissions trial judiciary, and detainee monitoring at Guantanamo Bay – issues that have contributed significantly to the unreasonably long pre-trial litigation phase of the commissions;
  • Argues that modest reforms would enable the commissions to accelerate the pace of pretrial litigation without undermining the rights of the Accused;
  • Proposes actionable recommendations that can help resolve these procedural delays to justice and protect an important war power for the United States.

Click here to read the complete paper.

About the Author:

Adam Pearlman is a former Associate Deputy General Counsel of the United States Department of Defense.  While at DoD, he was agency counsel for complex civil and criminal national security matters in federal and military courts, and led the Supreme Court and appellate unit of the team dedicated to litigating classified counterterrorism cases.

Fault Lines Podcast

 

The National Security Institute is excited to announce NSI’s first episode in our Fault Lines podcast mini-series with Lawfare.  This episode focused on the ongoing civil war in Yemen, Saudi Arabia, and American policy in the region and featured Fault Lines regulars:

  • NSI Founder and Executive Director Jamil N. Jaffer;
  • NSI Senior Fellow and former Staff Director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Lester Munson;
  • Former Staff Director of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Jodi Herman
  • Former Senior Democratic Staffer for the Middle East on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Dana Stroul

Fault Lines brings together experts with years of experience working on national security issues that divide the political left and right.  The series aspires to highlight both the areas of stark contrast and unlikely agreement in foreign policy-making that exist in today’s polarized atmosphere.

Subscribe to the Lawfare Podcast to get this and future episodes of Fault Lines.

Listen Now